Southern Pacific Lines

Coast Line Division 

“The Route of the Octopus”

 
 

General Information

  1. The Lark, inaugurated in 1910, was from the beginning a deluxe, business-travel-oriented train. With the immense popularity of the Daylight, SP decided that the market would support an all-Pullman sleeper night train along the same route. The heavyweight night trains became completely streamlined in March of 1941. Two 18-car train sets were ordered for the premium service Larks (trains 75/75).

References

                                                             Southern Pacific Passenger Trains: Volume 1 Night Trains of the Coast Route, Ryan & Shine                                                                       


The Lark Train Timeline

1920’s

  1. In the ‘20s, diner cars on eastbound routes were turned at SLO to avoid being pulled over the Cuesta Grade. The Northbound Lark would stop and deliver mail and passengers at Surf. On the Lark from 1941-1950, the dining car had a Steward, Chef, 3 cooks, pantryman, bartender, and waiter.

1941

  1. The Lark did stop in Santa Barbara. The Lark arrived in LA at 9:00 am (well before the Owl) with a stop in Glendale on the way. The Lark’s RPO was 75 going north and 76 going south.


  1. 1941 also saw the delivery of new cars for the completely re-equipped Lark. These sleepers, food service, and observation cars were all painted two-tone gray. The sleepers and observation cars were smooth-sided, but the articulated food service cars were fluted. SP copied the two-tone gray scheme from Pullman Standard and used it on the Lark and the 1950 Cascade until 1958. It was very similar to the paint scheme on the NY Central 20th Century Limited, also a night train.

1942

  1. In 1942, SP received additional two-tone gray sleeping cars for use on the Lark, Overland, and Golden State.

  2. Bruce Bloch

1946

  1. The Advance Lark ran only 4 months (Jun ‘46 - Sep. ‘46).

1949

  1. In 1949, radio-telephone booths were installed in the articulated foyer on each Lark Club car. A passenger agent was also added, but discontinued in 1951.


    Timetable             Train # Dep    Dep Time            Arrv    Arrv Time     Year

        Lark     75        LA9:00 pmSF9:00 am

        Lark     76        SF9:00 pmLA9:00 am‘49

1953

  1. In 1953 the Lark Train was numbered 75 & 76.

  2. By 1953, there was no regularly scheduled Coast Route train using heavyweight sleepers.

  3. The Lark operated in the middle of the night on the Guadelupe subdivision. The Lark did stop in Santa Barbara. The Lark arrived in LA at 9:00 am (well before the Owl) with a stop in Glendale on the way. The Lark’s RPO was 75 going north and 76 going south.

1955

  1. Lark GS powered until 1955, then E7 ‘47-50. The "Lark" was officially dieselized in January, 1955.

  2. In the diesel era the "Lark" was most likely to draw EMD E-units or AlcoPAs. Later it could have had FP7s, or even F7As with steam boiler controls (to control steam boiler equipped F7Bs) that Joe Strapac called "F7P" in his book "Southern Pacific Historic Diesels, Volume 3: E-Units and Passenger Fs". The F-units were all delivered in Black Widow colors.               

                    http://tinyurl.com/yflb443


  1. The "Lark" had a section that was split off in San Jose and went to Oakland called the "Oakland Lark". A photo of the "Oakland Lark" being pulled by a GP9 appears on page 68 in the book "Southern Pacific Passenger Trains Volume 1: Night Trains of the Coast Route" by Dennis Ryan and Joseph Shine

                    http://tinyurl.com/yznkcwh

1957

  1. May 1, 1957  OAK Lark (#73 & 74)  made their last runs.

  2. On July 15, 1957 the Lark and Starlight were combined.

1959

  1. In 1959, the Lark had only 7 Pullman  Cars in its consist.

1960

  1. The "Oakland Lark" made its last run on May 1, 1960.

1966

  1. By 1966 it had just 3 plus 2 coaches, dining & lounge and 2 headend cars.

1967

  1. RHO service discontinued on the Lark  Sep. 29, 1967.

1968

  1. The Lark discontinued service entirely Apr. 7, 1968, out of Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal

  2.                                                                         http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=308768



The Lark Train Consist

Lark Steam Motive Power


Lark Diesel Motive Power

  1. Joe Shine in "Night Trains of the Coast Route", pg 44 top photo shows a set of E-units on the point.


Lark Passenger Equipment

Consists

  1. Ryan and Shine in Southern Pacific Passenger Trains, Vol. 1 The Night Trains of the Coast Route state that Dalerose and Dale Daleside were assigned to the Lark until it was streamlined in 1941. Daleford and Dalepark were assigned to the Sunset Limited until it was cancelled in 1942 west of LA. Dalerose and Daleside returned after WWII for the Advance Lark, which only lasted about 4 months.


  1. Joe Shine in "Night Trains of the Coast Route", pg 44 top photo shows a 6-6-4 and 10-5 with SOUTHERN PACIFIC on the letterboard with the 3-digit number under the Lark insignia.


Lark Heavyweight Chair Car

  1. Pullman Lark first received Chair Cars on 10/28/56, 9 months prior to discontinuation of the Starlight.

  2. The Lark never had any 77' chair cars lettered the Lark.


Lark Coffee Shop Cars

  1. At the consolidation, Coffee Shop cars SP 10400 and 10401 were regularly assigned to 75 & 76 and operated just ahead of the first sleeper to act as a buffer between chair cars and the sleepers. Chair car paxs were denied use of the triple-unit.


Lark Lightweight Sleeper Cars

  1. The Lark ran with six different type of Pullman sleeper cars:

  2.     22  Pullman Roomette

  3.     14  Bedroom  Pullmans Sleepers

  4.     13  Bedroom  Pullmans Sleepers

  5.     12-1  Bedroom Pullmans Sleepers

  6.     10-5  Bedroom LW Pullman Sleeper

  7.     4-4-2 Bedroom LW Pullman Sleeper


  8.     10-4  LW Pullman Sleepers were used on the Lark from 1932-1941.

  9.                                                                               Trainline #116, pg. 38-39


Lark Observation

Letterboard Marker

  1. Those streamlined letterboard markers were moved further to the rear of the Lark and Daylight observation cars after two Lark rear-end accidents.

Light

  1. On the Lark cars, the small red and green markers on the roof came before the large Mars red light.  Remember, the four Lark cars never had roof mounted lights when new. The first change was that those streamlined letterboard markers were moved further to the rear of the Lark and Daylight observation cars after the two Lark rear-end accidents. The roof light eventually was fitted out with the red light and a white back-up light in the same housing. 

  2. Jeff Cauthen


Lark Articulated Chairs Cars

The Lark had articulated chairs  64-ACM-ACW.



Details

  1. Installation of radiotelephone 1949

  2. Tail signs on all trains discontinued summer of 1957

Lark Skirts and Full-width Diaphragms

  1. Skirts and full-width diaphragms were removed from the "prewar" Lark sleepers. It’s thought the skirts were removed between November 1949 and May 1952 as they were refurbished. The full-width diaphragms lasted longer than the skirts, since 1950 sleeper deliveries came with full-width diaphragms (but no skirts). Same for the "Lark Club" Kitchen-Diner-Lounge. A 1958 photo shows all skirts removed and full-width diaphragms only at the articulated joints. A 1953 shopping was the end of the skirts, and maybe the full-width diaphragms on the ends.


Interior Lighting

  1. Lark & Daylight car: Circa 1950

  2. The ceiling lights were fluorescent. The wall lights were incandescent [bedrooms, roometttes, compartments, drawing rooms] and of course the night lights were blue. The overhead room light had a blue incandescent bulb, as well as the wall lamps.


  3. Recessed fluorescents were introduced in 1934 but how fast everything was converted is unknown. In the early and mid 60's when the Daylight and Lark went to and from San Francisco it was fluorescent.


Paint

  1. repainting began6/47

  2. 2 sets of articulated chair cars, 2402-2403 and 2404-2405 were assigned to the Lark, painted two-tone gray and carried the Lark logo. Cars from the Daylight pool were assigned on a regular basis, and the red-orange-black could be seen every night. The articulated chair cars lost their grey paint before the end of the 50’s.

  3. The articulated chair cars were seen in unpainted stainless steel, simulated stainless steel pain scheme 6/58

Lark Stripe

  1. The width of the light grey letterboard is indicated as being 20-15/16" on page 106 of the SPH&TS Southern Pacific Painting and Lettering Guide, but in Dennis Ryan's Southern Pacific Passenger Trains - Vol. 1 that measurement is 20-5/16". Yet another diagram from Southern Pacific shows the light grey portion of the letterboard on the Cascade as 17-1/4" (after the black edging was deleted from the silver grey striping). At some point (not sure when) the dimensions changed so that the dark grey window band and striping was raised to better accommodate the higher windows on the corrugated cars.

  2. Warren Weiss


  3. I never even noticed our typo in the 20-5/16" vs. 20-15/16".  20-5/16" is correct.

  4. Jeffrey Alan Cauthen


Lettering & Numbering

1946

  1. Relettering began

  2. The articulated chair cars were seen with crimson letter board. Separation stripes at the top and bottom of the sides of the Lark equipment shows 4 stripes as per SP drawings #DP-28390 (Painting/Lettering for all Lark cars) dated 6/2/48. Cars built by Pullman in 6/49 have 4 stripes, cars built 10/49 omit top stripe only and cars delivered 12/49 have 2 stripes. So a change was made officially in late 1948, early 1949, but the stripes may have started disappearing late ‘47.

1947

  1. Aluminum bronze lettering/stripes changed to silver gray. Only stripping which separated 2 tone gray above and below windows reapplied.

1948

  1. Car type names applied 2 1/2” numbers moved to under Lark herald.

1949

  1. 11/49-11/51 Removal of Pullman lettering. Pullman words replaced with Southern Pacific on sleepers. 2 1/2” Pullman words applied to each end of letterboard. Sleepers also got postwar S.P. roster numbers under Lark herald (*see PT1-40).



Modeling Lark Heavweight Passenger Cars

Athearn 

Good

Coach Yard

  1. With the Coach yard Lark cars you’ll have no trouble on a layout with a 36 Inch radius and staging that is 28 In Rad. The good thing is that Coach cars are so heavy that coming off the track is a little less than most cars.

  2. Bob Liberman

LaBelle

Good #1905

Walthers SP Lark (new HO passengers cars)

  1. You could  have most of an early "PULLMAN" LW Lark using Walthers cars since they made all but the 13 bdm sleepers with the Pullman 4 stripe scheme; Underbody may not be correct. Still need head end, triple unit, and obs. The blunt end obs; the somewhat updated one where 22 rmte cars replaced  the 6-6-4s and 10-6s replaced the 10-5s, still in TTG, and where you could sometimes  find Cascade TTG cars on the Lark. Or the late Lark with Sunset equipment, no triple unit, an Automat etc.

Paint

  1. Walthers new heavyweight passenger cars painted (two tone grey). This is a 1954 scheme.


Modeling Lettering & Numbering

Decals  

Champ Lark decals

  1. SHS-209 was Cascade.

  2. SHS-410 was Southern Pacific "Lark" Passenger Cars.

  3.     The blurb for that set says it has "completely redrawn artwork from RR blueprints, of the "Lark" medallion". Also the previously    

  4.      issued set with white lettering has been replaced by this one, with all lettering in Lettering Gray.


  5.     The best herald for the "Lark" is in the Super Set from Champ.  The colors are nice and are fit the requirements as depicted in

  6.     "Night Trains Of the Southern Pacific," Volume 1.

  7. BRH-157 was for Southern Pacific "Daylight" Passenger Cars.

  8.     Passenger Car -- aluminum lettering, with a newly drawn four-color herald.  Champ Catalog #88, dated April (sic) 1987


  9. Champ Decals are now out of business. Keep watching EBAY!

Coach Yard

                                     #1037two tone gray Lark

#1039 deluxe gold lettering for dark olive heavyweight cars

#1038 post ‘58 lettering for scarlet -silver paint


See:                                            (*see PT2-42)

Microscale Lark Decals

  1. Microscale makes a Sheet with most, if not all the Espee Heralds on them, and if you mean the " Ball n Wing W/ script design on the side of each car being the Heralds Go to www.microscale.com, Click on "Products ", Scroll down to "Southern Pacific” and then scroll down to the appropriate decal.


  2. The only thing that is useful on the microscale sets is the numbers off the Daylight set. The correct heralds are found on Champ decals and the correct lettering is from Coach Yards #158 for the tt gray, which by the way is the right lettering for the 1946-58 Daylight. I can't remember if these sheets have the per 1946 lettering or not. So unless microscale has upgraded their work it is not correct. See my article in RMC march of 04 on building the Lark cars.


  3. Comparison of the PROTOTYPE (you do know about the prototype?) Lark emblem, and  for that matter other train emblems, will show you quickly what are the shortcomings of the Microscale, vs. Champ, emblems.

  4. Tony Thompson      

Thinfilm

  1. Thinfilm #158 is right for both Daylight and 2TG cars per 1958.


Lark Stripes

  1. Lettering and strips for the 1941 Lark passenger train. Pullman lettering was 7" Aluminium Bronze edged with 1/8" black.  Stripping was 1 3/4" aluminium edged in 1/4" black.

  2. Jeff Cauthen


  1. Depends which version of the Lark modelers want--the  early one with 4 stripes, the somewhat later one with just the two stripes, the ones that have Southern Pacific on the letterboard with 2 stripes and partial skirts. Still need the Lark heralds.


SP Passenger Car Emblems

Microscale

  1. Microscale decals (87-761) Southern Pacific Passenger Car Emblems. The Cascade and Lark emblems have two sets, one labeled "revised". The first set have black outlined letters, and the "revised" set have red outlined letters. The letters are orange color.


Lark Logo

  1. Lark lettering was Daylight Orange edged in black, the ball was Aluminum Bronze, and the outline of the wings were Aluminum Bronze edged in black. The Golden State and Daylight insignias that were Dark Gray after 1958 still had the black edging.

Champ

  1. The only correct Lark logo was done by Champ.

MicroScales

  1. Microscale decals has a sheet dedicated to Sp name trains with their logos. The MicroScale sheet is incorrect.   



Lark Operation

Lark Sections and the Coast Merchandiser

  1. There are photos of the Advance CME in Signor's Coast Line book on pages 185 and 190. Both are in daylight and clearly marked as train #372. They are both near San Francisco and the departure time was 3:01 PM, 3:55 PM or 4:01PM depending on what timetable was effective.


  2. The photos in Ryan and Shine's Night Trains of the Coast on page 74 clearly show Lark indicators. But in reading the captions I do not see the problem of advance sections. What it says is "When the Lark's train indicators displayed "1-75" or "1-76" the were usually running ahead of the Coast Merchandise West or Coast Merchandise East which often ran throughout the 1950's and 1960's as trains 75 and 76..."


  3. The normal CMW or CME ran ahead of the Lark in both directions. But if SP wanted to run additional overnight merchandise trains on the Lark's schedule, they would be run later.


  4.         *See “Rights of Trains” from four SP rule books dated Feb. 15, 1943, Dec. 1, 1951, July 1, 1960 and Jan. 1, 1969.


  5.         *See the timetables for the Coast and pulled several from #154 effective June 2, 1946 to Western Division #9 effective Oct. 1,        

  6.                  1967, [which was the last timetable before the Lark's demise].


  7. If we look at rule 92 there is a change between the 1943 rules and the 1951 rules. The 1943 rules clearly state "A train must not arrive at a station in advance of its schedule arriving time. A train must not leave a station in advance of its schedule leaving train." The 1951 and later rules read "A train carrying passengers or mail must not leave the place where traffic is received or discharged at a station in advance of its schedule leaving time."


  8. It’s unknown why this change since rules 86 and 87 were not changed and still require inferior trains to clear the main for superior trains with sufficient time to avoid delay. The timetable schedule for regular trains allows them to be up to 12 hours late and still have class and direction authority.  Clearances and or form F orders can be issued to create sections of any scheduled train. This appears to be how the extra merchandise trains ran on the Lark schedule. This would not, however, allow the sections to run ahead of the timetable schedule. They could run ahead of the Lark. The caption on page 74 of the Night Trains volume seems to indicate that they ran after the Lark and not before. Arrival time was about 9:00 AM so the later sections would clearly be in the daylight for the last 50 to 100 miles depending on the season.


  9. Just another comment on an earlier rules discussion. In that period after May 1, 1971 when Amtrak was running trains and the Daylight was still on the SP schedule, The 98-99 would have been annulled and the Amtrak train would have orders written making it an extra train. Form K orders annuls a schedule or section. A schedule or section anulled  becomes void and cannot be restored. A form B and form C order could grant right over all other trains allowing the Amtrak passenger authority as a first class train even though it was running as an extra.


  10. Lark's schedule was 9 pm departure, 9AM arrival. Later, the arrival time was moved up to 8:30AM. Summer timetables [when CA was on daylight savings time] were sometimes printed in standard time so showed the Lark's schedule as one hour earlier, but still 9-9 or 9-8:30 PDT. Almost the same transit time as Amtraks Coast Starlight, the difference being is that you could usually set your watch by the Lark. It had some pad [compared to 98/99 which ran on a 9-3/4 hr schedule]. The Lark's 12 hr schedule included 20 min in San Jose to pull cars for the Oakland Lark. The Lark also had more stops than the Daylight. There was a period of green flags on the Lark.


Lark Sections in the day time

  1. There’s a photo is on page 115 of the Southern Pacific Official Color Photography, Vol 1]. The Lark as is well known was a night train so most of the photos we have of the Lark itself are early morning upon arrival or nearing arrival at either end - San Francisco or Los Angeles.


  2. The Coast Division Employee Timetable for that date would have been #175 effective Sunday, April 27, 1958. The times for the Westbound Lark 75 at Watsonville Junction are 4:40 and 4:48 AM. The photo shows shadows but only under the train which would lead one to believe it is near mid-day. That could mean the train could be running 7+ hours late. While this could happen, it is unlikely since the Lark (as did most SP passenger trains) usually ran on time.


  3. It might be noted that one second section of the Lark actually collided with the rear of the first section near Paso Robles in September of 1941. The "Overnighters", "Zippers", CME/CMW trains were not slow but were considered first class trains and kept the same SFO-LA times or faster than the passenger trains.


  4. The photo is in color and shows a reddish earth that is common just east of the Pajaro river as the tracks drop down to cross Elkhorn Slough.


  5. There's no mystery about the page-115-in-the-Morning-Sun pic. The train shown is the last section of 75; the Lark itself hopefully is in the SF coachyard by now.


  6. These are official photos so maybe this was a staged publicity shot. That might explain why it is in the day time.


  7. It is suggested that the last section was not required to have a section number. This would make the train around 7 or 8 hours behind the time of 1-75. Presumably this would require issuing orders to everyone; It’s doubtful all traffic on the Coast Line stopped for 7 or 8 hours waiting for that second section to arrive. If you have to issue orders everywhere, why not run an extra? the gain to the dispatcher to utilize timetable authority seems minimal in such a case.

  8. Tony Thompson 


  9. The dispatcher can benefit from running a train as a scheduled train and not an extra, even when it is several hours after the schedule time and not create a lot of extra work. A time order form E could be issued that would require the train to operate at certain lateness and not require the rewriting of he whole schedule in the train order. By assigning the train a first class schedule, the DS has given the train superiority over lower class trains and extras. The inferior trains would have to clear for the superior train and in non CTC territory would help speed up the superior train. Being a scheduled train could help passing through yard limits


  10. "An order for an extra can bestow rights over all trains and can specify a clearing time."


  11. Sure-- but the order would have to give a time for the extra at each siding, which seems like unnecessary work for the dispatcher. Or, if they just say "Extra so-and-so West run extra Santa Margarita to Watsonville Jct. and wait at Santa Margarita until 100 AM" then at 1:00 AM the whole 100+ miles of railroad is shut down for all other trains-- right? (May not be quite right, but close enough.)


  12. The dispatcher had several ways of moving trains against each other in timetable and train orders areas. The DS could, issue fixed meets, run late orders, rights over with or without wait times. It was determined by the traffic and type of trains on the railroad and what the DS felt would work.


  13. As for running in advance of a schedule, the rulebook stated that where a single time is shown at a station in a schedule it is the leaving time except for the destination point. The train is allowed to depart at the time shown in the schedule, the crew must wait for that time. The schedule is in effect for 12 hours after the leaving time and the train can run late at any time within that time period unless restricted by train orders.


Lark Operation Pull-Up

  1. The vestibule is to the rear on the 6-6-4. Presumably so the passengers can get on/off on the station platforms with a 20 car train; also passengers riding that car don't have quite so far to walk from the station either. If there were no red cap service at a station, it also makes for efficient loading/unloading as the porters in the adjacent cars can load/unload baggage at one trap, then passengers can get on/off the other door. Also keeps passengers away from the mail handling & mail carts at the RPO.


  2. Passenger trains did a "pull up" in the case of the train being longer than the platform. A simplistic description is as follows. The train is stopped with the front half aligned with the platform. After all loading/unloading is complete, the train "pulls up" so that the rear half is aligned with the platform.


  3. There is common move referred to as a "reverse pullup." This manuever involves overshooting the station and consequently having to "backup" the train to the proper location on the platform which is where the engineer should have stopped in the first place!


Cutoffs

  1. The Lark and Daylight both had Oakland sections that were split off or joined to the San Francisco section at San Jose. This finished about 1958 or 59. The switching was performed quickly by a San Jose switch engine. In the case of the Lark, the observation car and the last 1 or 2 sleepers were cut off and added to an engine and head end cars for Oakland. That was pretty simple. Going south, the cars were added to the train after it stopped.

  2. Mike Tisdale


  3. The Lark carried baggage and some express, but these cars were not switched out enroute. All of these trains operated as a "unit" and were on a tight schedule, so no shuffling of cars would have normally occurred during the trains operation. Of course, equipment failure would require shifting cars around as necessary to ensure the train's performance.

  4. Bill Daniels


Lark Safety Directive

  1. Sleepers to operate with aisle side to inside of double track for extra measure of safety against shifting loads. Therefore:

  2. 13 BDR and 4-4-2 sleepers operated with vestibule fwd, facing

  3. 10-5        Pullmans sleepers operated with vestibule rear facing

  4. Note: not always followed.

Alignment of sleepers

  1. Alignment of sleepers on either side of Lark Club for emergency escape.

  2. Always followed.

  3. Pullmanahead of Lark Club      aligned vestibule - rear

  4. Sleeperbehind Lark Club      aligned vestibule- fwd

  5. Lark Clubtriple units                         aligned kitchen - fwd

  6. (standard practice with most dining cars)


Lark Observation Markers

  1. Within a yard limit, a marker would not be required certainly when the train has arrived and the indicators have been knocked down.

  2. Joe Gartman


References

  1. The Lark cars (and all other Espee Pullman-Standard built streamline cars) are also covered in these fine books:


  2. The Official Pullman-Standard Library, Vol. 5, Southern Pacific Prewar Cars

  3. The Official Pullman-Standard Library, Vol. 6, Southern Pacific Postwar Cars

  4. by W. David Randall and William M. Ross

  5. Railway Production Classics, 1988 and 1989


  6. Both books are long OOP, copies appear on eBay and elsewhere from time-to-time. They do include interior plans and b&w builder photos of the cars along with many interior views. The books also contain exterior side elevation drawings in HO scale.


  7. Try contacting RPC directly at:

  8. RPC Publications

  9. PO Box 503

  10. Alton  IL  62002


  11. At the 2004 Prototype Modelers Meeting held in Pleasanton, CA, Dave Allen provided an excellent clinic on researching passenger cars. Diagrams are available from most all the builders, including underbody details, from erection drawings. You'll need to know what to request and be aware of the perspective the drawings were made from.


  12. Complete erection drawings of all passenger cars built by Pullman-Standard are available from:

  13. Pullman Technology

  14. 16412 Lathrop Ave.

  15. Harvey  IL  60426


  16. "The Passenger Car Library, Volume 5, Santa Fe / Southern Pacific"

  17. by W. David Randall

  18. RPC Publications

  19. 2002

  20. No ISBN #


  21. In Volume 2 of the SPH&TS passenger series, there is a tables that shows which cars were numbered, painted two-tone gray, and so forth.  There’s information as to which cars were acquired by SP (and hence had SP on the letterboard) and which cars retained by Pullman were assigned to SP trains.


  22. SP & T&NO Passenger Cars 1934-37 rebuild notes(*see PT2-34, 35, 38)

  23. prewar Single-Unit Cars 1937-77



Specific Lark Cars

Lark Business Car

Paint

Lark Business Car Underbody

  1. The underbody of the Business cars painted when the car was painted TTG, the underbody was painted black.When painted SSS, the underbody was usually dark gray; except for the times when they were black or aluminum. There’s a shot of a business car with aluminum color trucks and a gray underbody!


Chair Cars

64-ACM-ACW Articulated Chair Cars

  1. The Lark had articulated chairs  64-ACM-ACW.


Diner

77-D-2

  1. Diner10095-10096Lark76194077-D-2, rebuilt 1924, modernized 1940 w/ Waukesha A/C    PT1-30

  2. Diner10200         Lark98SF1956PT2-250

  3. Diner Lounge10277-79Lark75triple unit, two tone grayPT1-46Pullman

Paint

  1. Two tone gray.

Lettering & Numbering

  1. In 1941 the Lark diner had the car numbers on the letterboard at the coupler ends of the dorm-kitchen and lounge only. Beginning in 1948 it had diner-lounge at these same ends only -- no lettering at the articulated ends.

  2. Jeff Cauthen

Modeling Diner

Limited Editions

  1. craftsmen kits; originals were of aluminum extrusion, last versions were resin.  It’s recommended that contact or rubber cement for construction, put on lightly and take great care to put these together and take your time; he had an excellent and patient modeler build cars for his layout


  2. kit #7452  201' Articulated Diner-Lounge-Dormitory; 1941 Lark

Union Station Products

  1. #7452       prewar "Lark Club" 3 car articulated lounge-diner-kitchen/dormitory


Dorm-Kitchen-Dining-Lounge Car

  1. Dorm-Kitchen-Dining-Lounge Car10274-76Lark761964triple unit articulated car rebuilt 1961 with smooth stainless steel sidingPT1-82203’6”


Drawing Rm-Buffet-Lounge -Observation car

  1. Sleeper  #400-401Oakland Lark2502 Bdr- 1 Comp - 1 Drawing Rm-Buffet-Lounge -Observation car, (*see renumbering PT1-40)


Lark Lounge car  #2979

  1. All six had a center bar.

Paint

  1. All six of these cars were painted TTG for the Lark and Overland. 

  2. Jeff Cauthen


All Day Lunch Cars

  1. AAR-car-type designation for All Day Lunch Cars

  2. The Lark and Cascade units were 70-ADL-1, 57-ADL-1, 70-ADL-2, etc.


  3. AD   = articulated diner

  4. ADL = articulated diner lounge


Automat Buffet(Pullman)

  1. Automat Buffet#10610Used on Lark #76 in SFduring 1968 former # 9158 sleeper  (*see PT1-80)


Coffee Shop

  1. At the consolidation, Coffee Shop cars SP #10400 and #10401 were regularly assigned to 75 & 76 and operated just ahead of the first sleeper to act as a buffer between chair cars and the sleepers.


  2. Coffee Shop-Kitchen-Dining10261-60-59Lark76propane stove & loading hatch aisle side of kitchen car, ran 4/13/46 on Morning Daylight194180-  -72

  3. Coffee Shop10400Lark76SFassigned to Lark, Daylight colorsPT1-561968

  4. Coffee Shop10401Lark76SF1958reassigned to Noon Daylight 1/48 to operate with #10400 kitchen to kitchen, reassigned to Starlight 10/49See:  (PT2-251)

Paint

  1. These cars were red-orange-black and remained that way into the 60’s when they were stripped of paint to bare stainless steel.

Lettering & Numbering

  1. SP 10400 received the stylized grey Daylight Logo, while 10401 had only the car number on the name plate.

  2. It carried the San Joaquin logo.


Lark Observation Car

Details

MV lens

  1. In the 1941 Lark observation car the lenses in the side "bullet" lights are red to the rear.

  2. Ed Hall

Tail light

  1. On the Lark cars, the small red and green markers on the roof came before the large Mars red light. Remember, the four Lark cars never had roof mounted lights when new. The first change was that those streamlined letterboard markers were moved further to the rear of the Lark and Daylight observation cars after the two Lark rear-end accidents. The roof light eventually was fitted out with the red light and a white back-up light in the same housing. 

  2. Jeff Cauthen


Lark Sleepers

Lark Skirts and Full-width Diaphragms

  1. Skirts and full-width diaphragms were removed from the "prewar" Lark sleepers. It’s thought the skirts were removed between November 1949 and May 1952 as they were refurbished. The full-width diaphragms lasted longer than the skirts, since 1950 sleeper deliveries came with full-width diaphragms (but no skirts). Same for the "Lark Club" Kitchen-Diner-Lounge. A 1958 photo shows all skirts removed and full-width diaphragms only at the articulated joints. A 1953 shopping was the end of the skirts, and maybe the full-width diaphragms on the ends.

Lark Safety

  1. Alignment of sleepers on either side of Lark Club for emergency escape.

  2. Always followed:

  3. Pullmanahead ofLark Club aligned vestibule - rear

  4. Sleeperbehind  Lark Club aligned vestibule- fwd

  5. Triple units Lark Club aligned kitchen - fwd

  6. (standard practice with most dining cars)


22 Pullman Roomette

  1. Sleeper #9305-9306Used on Lark #75 in 195022 Roomette


14 Bedroom  Pullmans Sleepers

  1. SleeperUsed on Lark #76“Night Ridge”, 14 single bedroom

  2. SleeperUsed on Lark #76“Night Trail”,  14 single bedroom


13 Bedroom  Pullmans Sleepers

  1. Sleeper  #300-307Used on Lark #76        13 BDR,                         (*see: renumbering PT1-40),

  2.                   #302-303 renumbered 1941, #9352-53 operated 'til 1963          (*see: PT1-40)

  3. Sleeper   #3542Used on Lark #76                  13 DBR

  4. Sleeper   #3546Used on Oakland Lark#76   13 DBR


12-1  Pullmans Sleepers

  1. Sleeper #9401Used on Lark #76 in SF in 1961See:  (*see: PT1-69)

Modeling 12-1 Pullman Sleeper / Coach

Branchline SP Pullmans Sleepers

  1. SP purchased the 12-1s sleepers of Plans 3410, 3410A, and 3410B.

  2. Jeff Cauthen


  3. The Branchline SP 12-1 pullman cars are correct for SP Coast Line trains. According to the Car Assignment Database. Pre-1942,12-1 cars were used on coast SP trains Coaster, Lark, Starlight and Sunset Limited. 8-1-2 cars were not assigned on any coast SP trains.

  4. Jeff Cauthen


10-5 Sleeper LW Lark Pullman


4-4-2 Sleeper LW Lark Pullman


10-6 Budd Sleepers 

  1. The "Lark" also carried two Budd 10-6 Sleepers too. That is in the "Night Trains Of  The Southern Pacific," Volume 1.

  2. Sleeper  #513-516Used on Lark #76    10 Roomette-6 DBR, 6-6-4, renumbered 9162-9165

  3. Sleeper  #9001Used on Lark #76  in SF in 1956    (*see: PT1-PT1-66)


10-5 Lightweight Pullman Sleeper / Coach

  1. 10-5 and 6-6-4 Pullmans were lightweight sleepers. All other SP sleepers were heavyweight.


  1. Sleeper  #100-109Used on Lark #7610-5 sleeper,                  (*see renumbering PT1-40)

  2. Sleeper  #106Used on Lark in 194110 roomette-5BRD sleeper(*see: PT1-46)

  3. Sleeper  #3540Used on Lark #7610-5 sleeper

  4. Sleeper  #3544Used on Oakland Lark#73in 1941-42   10-5 sleeper

References

  1. For modern (Post 1933) LW sleepers, the new issue of Railway Prototype Cyclopedia (RPCYC No. 11) is devoted entirely to them. It covers Pullman, Budd and a slight mention of AC&F. It covers the history and the appliances such as A/C, trucks, generators, etc. While not specific to Espee it covers cars used by them.

Modeling 10-5 Pullman Sleeper / Coach

Walther's PS 10-5 sleepers / coaches

  1. These do represent actual SP cars, the 10-5 is good for the Lark.

Paint

  1. The PS 10-5 sleeper model comes in stainless steel. The new 10-5s have the correct dark gray trucks and underbodies.

Lettering & Numbering

  1. The PS 10-5 sleeper model comes with a red letterboard.


10-4 Pullman Private Section Cars

  1. In 1931/32 Pullman converted 19 plan 2412 cars to plan 2412H with 10 sections, 4 private sections. The private sections had a lavatory annex. A timetable shows that in 1932 they were used on the Lark and the Sunset between LA and SF.


  2. The were several names of the cars which were candidates for operation in the 1932-40 time period on the SP.

  3. The names of the cars which were candidates for operation in the 1932-40 time period on the SP were Dalemont, Daleside, Dalerose, Daleford, Dalepark, Daleshire, Dalesburg, Dalemead, Dalecrest and Daleville.


  4. Ryan and Shine in Southern Pacific Passenger Trains, Vol. 1 The Night Trains of the Caost Route state that Dalerose and Daleside were two assigned to the Lark until it was streamlined in 1941. Daleford and Dalepark were assigned to the Sunset Limited until it was cancelled in 1942. Dalerose and Daleside returned after WWII for the Advance Lark, which only lasted about 4 months.


10-1-2 Pullman Sleepers

  1. Used on Advance Lark in 1946 “Lake Albert”, used on Adv. Lark and Coaster, 10 section, 1-DR-2-CompSleeper

  2.                                                                         (*see: PT1-38)


7-2 Pullman Sleepers

  1. Pullman 7-2 sleepers shown acquired by SP were purchased for conversion to Bunk or Roadway service. SP never owned any 7-2 sleepers, effective 12/31/1948, for use on their trains. 7-2 sleepers were assigned to the Lark (pre-1941) and Advance Lark (post war) over the years by Pullman.


  2. It is unlikely that 7-2s saw much revenue service on the SP after WW2.

Paint

  1. There were several colors used from time to time: Silver roof on the steel cars was most common, although earlier (former passenger) cars are known also to have had black or mineral red roofs; sides were in later years a "light smoke gray" used for MW equipment, but in earlier times boxcar (mineral) red was also common.


  2. Any 7-2s assigned to the Lark were operated and owned by Pullman and so painted.

Reference

  1. See Shine and Ryan, Vol. 1, The Night Trains.


6-6-4 Lark Sleepers

  1. Joe Shine in "Night Trains of the Coast Route", pg 44 top photo shows a 6-6-4 and 10-5 with SOUTHERN PACIFIC on the letterboard with the 3-digit number under the Lark insignia. The caption says this photo was shot in 1947; has a set of E-units on the point. Caption also asks why the vestibule is to the rear on the 6-6-4.6-6-4 Pullman Sleepers

  2. Sleeper #3544Used on Lark #761948-506-6-4 sleeper

  3. Sleeper #3545    Used on Lark #756-6-4 sleeper


6-3 Pullman Sleeper

  1. SP had 6-3 Plan 3523 heavyweight sleepers.

  2. The Advance Lark carried a 6-3, among other configurations.


4-4-2 Pullman Sleepers

  1. A smooth side P-S sleepers of types 4-4-2 are correct for SP.

    Sleeper  #200-205Used on Lark #75  4 Bdr-4 Comp- 2 Drawing Rm, (*see: renumbering PT1-40)

    Sleeper       #3541Used on Lark #75  4 Bdr-4 Comp- 2 Drawing Rm

    Sleeper       #9106Used on Lark #76  4-DBR-4-comp-2DR Sleeper 1955  (*see: PT1-47)

Paint

  1. The 4-4-2 in 2-tone gray is correct.





  2.  

Southern Pacific Lines
S.P. Lark Train
General Info
The Lark Train Timeline

The Lark Train Consist
Steam Motive Power
Diesel Motive Power
Passenger Car Equipment

Lark Operation
Lark and Coast Merchandiser
Lark in the Daytime

Specific Lark Cars
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